Takeover Day 2019

On Wednesday 20 November, year 8 students from King Harold Business & Enterprise Academy, took over the running of the museum as part of Takeover Day.

Visitors took part in a tour, activities and a trail all devised and led by the students, and were in charge of our Twitter and Facebook accounts for the day.

Three students were even interviewed live on BBC Essex radio – something they only found out about an hour before going on air.

Lilly live on air with Richard Smith from BBC Essex

The 10 pupils worked with staff, in a series of preparations days, to learn more about the day to day running of the museum; they were given a behind the scenes tour, handled objects from the collections, created posters and content for their tours.

Climate change

They themed their take over around climate change, linking it to the current Ice Age exhibition; this period was a natural form of climate change, comparing it to now as more manmade through global warming.

One gallery had been declared a ‘no go zone’ to represent how, through climate change, parts of the world will disappear and be submerged in the oceans. Another gallery was filled with one week’s worth of rubbish to show how much waste each household has and to encourage visitors to recycle as much as they can.

Jack, Rhiannon, Rhianna and Archie with Woolly and a small forest of handmade trees

One activity the year 8s run was to make little trees from cork, a cocktail stick, beads and ripped paper. Each tree represented a real endangered tree and was given a label with details of where the tree currently survives and why it is under threat of extinction. This small forest of trees will be on display until the beginning of December.

A word from the students

We asked the pupils what they did as part of Takeover Day, what they enjoyed and what they learnt that surprised them about working in a museum – here are their answers:

Mark: I did the tours [and enjoyed] all of it.

Rhianna: I was posting on social media updating Twitter and Facebook for the public and update our #takeoverday . I enjoyed making captions and doing the social media.

Mark and Dmithry giving their tour to the headteacher and deputy head of King Harold Academy

Obinna: I did a tour, [and enjoyed] doing tours and being on the radio.

Dmithry: I did the tours with Mark, [enjoyed] all of it and [learnt that working in a museum] is really fun.

Joni: I took part in the tree activity. I enjoyed making trees and helping others make them. I was surprised that I was going to be on the radio.

Louie: I advertised outside, I had a go at a tour, I spoke to the chairman and helped people make trees. [I enjoyed] speaking to the chairman 1 on 1 (I found that really exciting). I’m quite good at advertising and drawing people in.

Lilly: We learnt about climate change and we done tour and other jobs that people who work here do. [I enjoyed] everything. I learnt a lot about climate change and how people work in the museum.

Rhiannon: I was posting on social media updating Twitter and Facebook about our takeover day. I enjoyed making the different captions for our tweets and taking the pictures, I also enjoyed spotting our woolly mammoth. I learnt how much work, effort and time goes into the takeover day.

Archie: I made trees, helped with snakes and ladders and made a poster. [I enjoyed] making trees. [I learnt working in a museum] is easy.

Takeover Day

Takeover Day is a national celebration (created by Kids in Museums) of young people’s contributions to museums, galleries, arts organisations, archives and heritage sites. It’s a day on which they work alongside staff and volunteers to participate in the life of the organisation or venue.

To find more, visit https://kidsinmuseums.org.uk/takeoverday/

What’s On for Adults

Wellness and Wellies

Every Wednesday

2pm – 4pm, Free

Join our volunteer gardening club. Everyone is welcome, whether you’re an experienced gardener or a complete beginner. It’s a chance to sow and grow, learn new skills, try out ideas and make new friends. Perfect for those who have no garden, but would like one.

No need to book, just drop in. For further information please contact Victoria Robertson, Community Engagement Officer. Tel: 01992 564561 vrobertson@eppingforestdc.gov.uk

Museum Movers

Friday 6 September 2019 – Friday 13 December 2019

Friday 10 January 2020 – Friday 3 April 2020

10.30am – 12noon

£2.50 includes tea and coffee

55+ years

Museum Movers are fun, informal dance sessions, designed to promote health, well-being and freedom of movement. You are welcome to do a seated version or can challenge yourself by performing the moves standing. All abilities are welcome. No need to book, just drop in. Please wear clothes that are comfortable to move in.

Victorian Garland Making Working

Wednesday 27 November

1pm – 3pm

£15

16+ years

Come along and make a garland using fresh herbs and dehydrated fruit to add a festive scented Victorian touch to your home this Christmas. Together we will begin the session by gathering a selection of fresh herbs from our medicinal garden here at the museum.

Book at https://eppingforestdc.bookinglive.com/ or call 01992 564226 (Monday – Friday 10am – 4pm)

Prehistoric Art talk by Dr Paul Bahn

Thursday 5 December

Waltham Abbey Town Hall, Highbridge Street, Waltham Abbey, EN9 1DE

8pm, doors open 7.15pm for book sales and signing     

£10 per person

Booking essential

Join us for this very special opportunity to hear Dr Paul Bahn, leading world expert on the art of the Ice Age, introduce us to the incredible images created by our ancestors, tens of thousands of years ago. Talk is sponsored by Andante Travels.

Book at https://eppingforestdc.bookinglive.com/ or call 01992 564226 (Monday – Friday 10am – 4pm)

What’s On – Out and About

The Barking Dog Theatre Company presents…Alice in Wonderland

Friday 1 November

North Weald Village Hall, High Road, North Weald CM16 6BU

11am

£8 per ticket, most suitable for 5 – 9 years but all ages welcome

The Barking Dog Theatre Company presents an exciting adaptation of one of the most famous books, Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland.

You can expect catchy sing-along songs, fabulous puppets and lots of 
surprises. From when Alice falls down the rabbit hole to the hilarious and curious ending, everyone, even the adults, will be spellbound. A great show suitable for families and particularly for children aged five to nine years. Children must be accompanied by a responsible adult.

Booking line opens Monday 30 September https://eppingforestdc.bookinglive.com/ or call 01992 564226

What’s On – Special Events for Children and Families

Ice Age Exhibition: Opening Event

Tuesday 29 October

11am – 3pm

Admission free, craft activity £2.00 per child

All ages welcome

Join us for the opening of our Ice Age Exhibition, with a special display by Essex Rock and Mineral Society and the chance to make an Ice Age Animal Mask. Children must be accompanied by a responsible adult. No booking required, just drop in.

Spooky Steps Dance Workshop

Wednesday 30 October

10.30am – 12noon

£10, 5+ years

Booking essential

Come and celebrate Halloween by learning a dance based on the famous ‘Thriller’ video and play some spooky themed games. Please feel free to come dressed up on a Halloween theme. Spooky fruity juices will be provided.

Book at https://eppingforestdc.bookinglive.com/ or call 01992 564226 (Monday – Friday 10am – 4pm)

Stone Age Flint Knapping

Saturday 2 November

11am – 4pm

Admission free, craft activity £2.00 per child

All ages welcome

Join us for an amazing demonstration of how tools were made during the Stone Age and make your own piece of Ice Age art. Children must be accompanied by a responsible adult. No booking required, just drop in.

Takeover Day

Wednesday 20 November

11am – 3pm

Students from King Harold Business & Enterprise Academy will be running the museum for the day. Join us to get involved with their activities, take a unique tour, and see how they have transformed the museum.

Cavalcade of Light

Friday 29 November

5pm – 7pm

All ages welcome

Explore the museum after hours as we celebrate the Cavalcade of Light. Before the lights are switched on join us for an evening of music, activities, and festive refreshments. No need to book. Children need to be accompanied by a responsible adult.

Father Christmas

Saturday 7 December

10.30am – 4pm

£6 per child, all ages welcome

Come along for our annual festive Christmas event.  Have a go at our Christmas craft, visit Father Christmas in his grotto and receive a gift. Children must be accompanied by a responsible adult. No need to book, just drop in.  You will be allocated a time to visit the grotto. You may be required to wait; art and craft activities are available to do while you wait.

Toddler Father Christmas

Tuesday 10 December

10am – 12noon

£6 per child, most suitable for toddlers aged 2 – 4 years

Our regular toddler session has a very special guest today. Father Christmas will be here in his grotto. As well as our regular rhyme, craft and story, you can also visit the grotto and receive a special gift. Children must be accompanied by a responsible adult. To book your place please call the museum on 01992 716882 or email museum@eppingforestdc.gov.uk

Morning Explorers

Saturday 12 October and Saturday 9 November

9am – 10am

Morning Explorers is a relaxed free early opening for families and children with autism spectrum conditions and sensory processing differences who would benefit from a quieter environment to explore the museum. Where possible gallery lights will be dimmed and interactives/sounds will be turned off.

Visitors will be invtied to use our Sensory Trail Backpacks (limited number available), take part in activities related to our exhibitions and enjoy a chill out space with sensory toys.

This is a drop in even, no need to book. Morning Explorers is suitable for families with children aged 2 – 15 years. Sibling are more than welcome too.

Sensory Trial Backpacks – these contain calming toys ear defenders and a sensory trail with activities to do in our galleries and garden. Available from Saturday 28 September.

A refundable deposit of £10 or a form of ID (i.e. driver’s licence or passport) will be required to use a backpack.

What’s On – Regular Events for Children and Families

Toddler Tuesdays

10am – 11am

2 – 4 years, £2 per child

Join in our fun, friendly session and help your child develop essential school-ready skills through rhymes, stories and craft.  Booking essential, call the museum on 01992 716882 or email museum@eppingforestdc.gov.uk Toddlers must be accompanied by a responsible adult. Up to two toddlers per adult.

22 October                  Old Mother Hubbard

19 November              Goosey Goosey Gander

14 January                  This is the Way …

11 February                Pancake Tuesday

17 March                     I had a Little Hobby Horse

Family Fun – Drop in Arts and Crafts

12noon – 3pm,

All ages welcome (most suitable for 5 – 11 year olds), £2 per child

Epping Forest District Museum, Sun Street, Waltham Abbey. Fun with Clay workshop.

Fun family art and craft activities for you to make together and take home. No need to book, just drop in and allow approximately 20 minutes for the activity. Children must be accompanied by a responsible adult.

October Half Term

29 Oct             Milk Bottle Mammoths

February Half Term

18 Feb             Space Craft

Easter

7 Apr               Easter Bunny Mask

14 Apr             Easter Flower Bower

We regret we cannot accommodate large groups or holiday clubs at these sessions.  Please contact us to arrange something.


What’s On – Exhibitions

Scouts, Skills and a Century of Change: The Untold Story of Gilwell Park

Saturday 10 August – Saturday 12 October

For 100 years Scouts around the world have travelled to Epping Forest to learn new skills, make friends and revel in its beautiful landscape.  Discover how Gilwell Park has become renown across the globe as the spiritual home of Scouting.

Ice Age

Saturday 26 October – Saturday 21 December

Discover some of the incredible creatures that roamed this area during the last great Ice Age. Find out why it happened, how long it lasted and how it shaped the Lee Valley we know today in this fascinating, family-friendly exhibition.

You Wear It Well

Saturday 25 January – Saturday 2 May

We have over 1500 pieces of costume and accessories, spanning 500 years in our collection. Items range from a Tudor stocking to a 2012 Paralympic Gamesmaker kit, and from uniforms to ballgowns via buttons and badges.

This exhibition gives you the chance to peek into the process of curating and caring for costumes, and to see some of the highlights and horrors discovered.

Epping Forest District Museum’s Education Offer

Find out more about the Education Sessions we have on offer and our workshops and loans box programme below.

Bringing your class to Epping Forest District Museum 2019 – 2020

Bringing your class to Lowewood Museum 2019 – 2020

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KS 1 Workshops and Loan Boxes 2019 – 2020

KS 2 Workshops and Loan Boxes 2019 – 2020

For further information or to make a booking please contact the museum:

E. museum@eppingforestdc.gov.uk

T. 01992 716882

Snapping the Stiletto – Emma Anderson (nee Hollis)

Read more about one of the inspirational women in our current exhibition ‘Snapping The Stiletto’

Hear from Emma Anderson (nee Hollis) in her own words.

“If it doesn’t work the first time, try again. Find a way or make a way,” I hear myself say to my class of Year 6 children who struggle to assemble moon buggies from mountains of cereals boxes and empty drinks bottles.

Yes, I’ve done it again; I’ve used Chigwell’s age old proverb to try and inspire and create resilience in my own classroom. Aut viam inveniam aut faciam.

During my time at Chigwell, these words were just a mere school motto, yet it was only in my post-Chigwell years that I found their true meaning. They resound through my academic, professional, and sporting careers. I believe that it was the resilience and determination that I developed during my nine years at Chigwell that have led me to where I am today, having accomplished dreams, but also overcome heartache.

Both my brother, James, and I have Osteogenesis Imperfecta; more commonly known as Brittle Bones. Growing up, we both found participating in the majority of sports difficult due to the strain these activities put upon our bones. A broken bone was a regular occurrence for us and we were often in school on crutches or in a sling. I entered the Junior School swimming gala in 2002 as I loved the water. I found that I did have some sporting prowess and could compete with my peers on a level playing field. I was determined to show my peers and teachers that although I was slow on the track, I had what it took to be an athlete in the pool – and that there were some fast-twitch muscles in there somewhere! From this moment on, I found my way into a swimming career that would last over a decade and take me all over the world.

In 2008, whilst studying for my GCSEs, I competed in one of my first Para-Swimming international meets. It was during this meet that I broke my first British Record in the 100 metres breaststroke; it wasn’t until after that I found out that I had missed the Beijing 2008 Paralympics qualifying time by less than a second. I was thrilled with my performance, and missing the qualifying time just made me even more determined to represent Team GB on the world stage.

emmaholliscompetinginthe100mbreaststrokeinreykjavik2c2009

Competing in the 100m Breaststroke in Reykjavik, 2009

My determination paid off and in 2009, I was selected in represent Team GB in the European Championships in Iceland. Much to my own surprise, I won a silver, and three bronze medals, and re-broke my own British Records. However these swimming successes came at a crucial point in my academic career: I was completing my A-Levels and had dreams of studying geography a top university after Iceland’s scenery had stolen my heart. Many had told me that I would have to choose between the two, yet it was a few influential teachers that told me I could still achieve both. Aut viam inveniam aut faciam. I decided to find my way, the Emma Hollis way!

emmahollisberlin2011-bronzeinthe100mfreestyle

Berlin 2011- Bronze in the 100m freestyle

The Emma Hollis way involved heading off to Loughborough University with 3As at A-Level under my belt and enrolling in the world renown Loughborough Swimming programme. I was the first Para-Swimmer to swim under Loughborough for many years and there were many within the swimming world who thought this move would end my swimming career. However, after that first firm handshake (another thing I was always taught to do whilst at Chigwell!) with my coach, Ian Armiger, I knew this was the programme for me.

Chigwell prepared me for life in university perfectly in terms of time management: I managed to study my BSc in Geography, swim like I’ve never swum before, alongside holding down a part time job in the Student’s Union. I took part in field work in Crete, the Peak District and Snowdonia and also went on training camps to the Canary Islands, Mallorca, Berlin, and sunny Manchester.

 

emmahollisbreakingthe800mfreestyleworldrecord

Breaking the 800m freestyle world record

Swimming under the Loughborough programme went from strength to strength; I was named top female Para-swimmer at the BUCS (British Universities and College Sport) on several occasions and won 3 bronze and 2 silver medals at the 2011 European Championships in Berlin. My time at Chigwell taught me to always strive for better: I always wanted to push myself to see what I could achieve. This could explain where I found the strength from in the last 50 metres of the 200m Individual Medley in Berlin to touch out my 6 foot tall German rival for the silver medal by 0.02 of a second. Later on that year, I went on to break the S8 800m freestyle and SM8 400m Individual Medley world records.

emmahollismeetingprinceharryatthe2012paralympicgames.

Meeting Prince Harry at the 2012 Paralympic Games.

2012 was always going to be an exciting year. I was swimming well and the London Paralympic Games were just round the corner. I qualified in March, and then after another meet in April, my place on the Paralympics GB team was confirmed. This was it; the pinnacle of my sporting career. The plan was to swim well in London, then retire to focus on my final year at university. As August came upon us, I was in top form and had never swum so well. Everything was going just to plan and my aim was to make the finals of my four events. The buzz of the Athlete’s Village in Stratford would be enough to spur anyone into action, but having my flat overlook the stadium was the cherry on the cake. As I took in the atmosphere walking through the village on my way to training on the day of the Opening Ceremony, I slipped off a kerb. At first, I looked at the blood seeping out my grazed knee, and then I noticed a deep throbbing pain in my ankle. I was rushed to the medical building and I was diagnosed with not only a broken ankle, but also a dislocated elbow. Instead of spending the days leading up to my race doing final preparation in the pool or relaxing in the village, I was under an MRI machine for hours on end, or having fluid drained off my joints that resembled grapefruits. Not the preparation I was hoping for, but I was determined to compete.

Aut viam inveniam aut faciam.                           

emmahollisafterracingatthe2012paralympicgamese28093moonbootandall21

After racing at the 2012 Paralympic Games – moon boot and all!

Race day arrived and at 5.00am, I was in the medical building having a local anaesthetic in the lower part of my right leg. Then I was ready to race. This procedure occurred for each of my events, and in each event, I finished last. Not the result I was looking for.

The Games came and went, and soon, all of this became a distant memory. I went back to university to complete my final year, and, despite what I had always said about retiring from swimming, I began to train again. My coach, Ian Armiger, had moved to the Cayman Islands and had invited me out to join him and travel around the islands to give motivational talks as part of the Caribbean’s Honouring Women’s Month.  Despite having a great time in the Caribbean and training well under the tropical sunshine, my injuries had taken their toll, and it took a lot longer than I thought to overcome them both physically and mentally. I decided to continue to swim until I graduated, and in my final competition, I finished with a number of personal best times. I finally felt that I had done myself justice and that my job was done. Anyway, retiring at 21 sounds great, doesn’t it?!

After graduating, I joined the working world and worked as part of a 2012 legacy charity that aimed to get young people out of gangs and into sports. I again had to call upon many of my life lessons I had learnt at Chigwell in terms of networking and public speaking. I enjoyed the job for a short time, but decided that working in an office was definitely not for me and I applied for a PGCE.

emmahollisintototherealworld21

Into to the real world!

Four years later and I’m in my own classroom, trying to not only get my 30 year sixes ready for SATS in the Spring, but also trying to round them into determined, independent, responsibly and resilient young people who are ready for whatever this world throws at them. After all, this is what my time at Chigwell did for me and I want to continue this legacy. I will always look back at my time at Chigwell affectionately, with pride and gratitude, and have learnt that there is nothing you can’t achieve with a bit of motivation, a firm handshake, and a sense of humour.