Local Legends: Edward Goldinge

Local Legends: Edward Goldinge 

We’ve come across some fascinating stories while researching our new school workshop, Local Legends, telling the stories of some important local people…

Did you know that Epping Forest District Museum occupies two old houses on Sun Street in Waltham Abbey? The older house was built in around 1520, during the reign of King Henry VIII.

The earliest resident who we think lived here was Edward Goldinge. He was a groom for Elizabeth I, in charge of the horses at the royal stables near to the Abbey Gardens. Kings and queens were frequent visitors to Waltham during this period, especially for the excellent hunting the ancient forests in the area offered.

Model of Tudor House showing smoke bayThere is a record of Edward living on Sun Street, in a location that could correspond with the house the museum is in today.  At this time the ground floor of the house was divided into three small rooms. The back room, known as the smoke bay, had a fire in the centre for cooking and heating the house. There was no floor above the smoke bay, so the smoke went straight up to the roof of the house and escaped through the rafters.

elizabeth I coin found in 1975 at 41 sun street

Chimneys became much more common later in the Tudor period, and one was added to this house to replace the smoke bay in around the 1560s.  When the museum was being refurbished a small silver coin dated 1562 was found near to this fireplace, which has helped us to date when this change took place.

Also on display in the museum are the remains of a leather Tudor shoe. This was found along with a piece of black Tudor stocking in the house opposite the museum, and together they make an unusual remnant of the past, as such biodegradable objects have usually rotted away over hundreds of years. Edward may have worn something very similar to this.

We have also found clues about what Edward may have done in his spare time. A die dating back to the sixteenth century was found at nearby Romeland in Waltham Abbey. Dice and card games were very popular in Tudor times, and people often gambled money on their games. Elizabeth I was reputed to be a keen card player. It is easy to imagine Edward relaxing at home on Sun Street with a few friends, playing dice or cards and perhaps even gambling a few Tudor coins on them.

If you have ever mislaid a coin, die or other small item at home, perhaps one day an archaeologist will find it and wonder about who you were, how you lived and what you liked to do…

 

 

Creativity Challenge

Over the next few weeks, we are having a go at some of the activities on the 2020 Creativity Challenge.  Join in with us and our partners in sharing your work and enjoy getting creative.

Shape in the clouds - a river of blueThis week, Cath, our Education Officer had a go at combining a few activities from the first column.  “Trying to spot shapes in clouds (not the easiest one with the beautiful blue skies this week!) also turned in to a chance to sketch the view from a window, then later that evening I tried to turn it into a sunset painting, although it was quite a challenge to capture the delicate pinky golden haze that filled the sky.”

Sunset painting and view from window - Cath

Here is another sunset painted by one of our followers and shared with us:

Sunset

Her friend has also had a go at writing a nature inspired poem after watching birds in the garden with her daughter.  They tried the Haiku format; a three-lined poem with 17 syllables – 5 on the first line, 7 on the second line, 5 on the third.  Haiku, a Japanese type of poem, is often inspired by nature.  They are usually very simple and direct and they don’t have to rhyme.  Don’t worry about the syllables for starters, just have a go …

Pigeon waits patient
Bird between emerging buds
Spring will surely come

Gone from the branch now
A space made in memory
Hope of new life still

Art and craft activities

Week 5 Collage

Collage 2Resources you’ll need

  • sheet of paper or card
  • glue
  • old magazines, wrapping paper, pictures, cards etc.

 

 

 

 

You can use a mix of images or stick to one theme.  To make it more challenging, you could draw an outline on the paper then make another image out of the pieces you are collaging such as the stem and leaves of a flower.

Try just tearing, rather than cutting out, the images you want to use to get a softer line.

Don’t forget to share your finished art works with us!

Art and craft activities

Week 4 – Make a Mark Activity

Mark makingResources you’ll need

  • sheet of paper folded into quarters
  • colouring pens or pencils

 

 

 

 

This week’s family fun art activity also comes from Leanne and the Art Resource boxes.  This time, all you need to do is take a sheet of a paper and fold it into quarters.  Unfold it again, then in one box draw circles, in another draw wavy lines, in a third draw a spiral then in the fourth try a scribble.  Add colour to the spaces you’ve created with your lines.  The artist Paul Klee talked about drawing as being like taking a line for a walk – this activity is a great way to practice this!

Easter Egg Hunt Ideas to try at home

Alternative Easter Egg Hunt ideas

We are sorry not to be welcoming you to the museum for our annual Easter Egg Hunt.  However, we thought we’d share some alternative chocolate-free ways of doing Egg Hunts that we enjoy.

Easter Trail sheetHave a go at our Easter Egg Letter Hunt – there are 9 eggs, each with a different letter on them.  Cut out the letter clues and hide them in different places, or if you haven’t got a printer just cut egg shapes out of paper or card and write letters on them.

The challenge is to find the letters around your home and garden and rearrange the letters to see what word it makes!

There’s some blank eggs so you can have a go at making up your own trail based on different words.

Download the trail sheet here: Alternative Easter Egg Hunt Letters and Blanks

Download the answer sheet here: Alternative Easter Egg Hunt Trail Sheet

Easter Scavenger Hunt Objects

Another fun thing to try is an Easter scavenger hunt – this really gets your brain working!  Think of a word that suits this time of year – it could be anything like bunny, spring, daffodil etc.  Then try and find things in your house that begin with each letter of that word.  I’ve had a go with Easter and managed to find …

Egg, Apple, Snake, Triceratops, Envelope, Rock

Don’t forget to share a photo of your word and objects – we love to see how creative you can be.

Have fun, and Happy Easter.

Local Legends: Dick Turpin

We’ve come across some fascinating stories while researching our new school workshop, Local Legends, telling the stories of some important local people…

1986.8.958

Turpin’s Cave

Did you know that the notorious highwayman, Dick Turpin, was said to have lived in a “cave” at Loughton Camp, Epping Forest at the height of his criminal activities? In 1735, with his accomplices in the Gregory Gang, Turpin is believed to have broken into Traps Hill Farm in Loughton, the home of an elderly widow named Shelley.

 

When Shelley refused to reveal where her money was hidden, the gang apparently threatened to roast her over a fire. The threat prompted her terrified son to say where their valuables were hidden. The gang found £100, which was a fortune at the time, a silver tankard and some other household items. Rather than making a quick getaway though, the gang made themselves at home, cooking up some supper, drinking beer and wine from the cellar and popping next door to rob the neighbour while their victims looked on:

“They afterwards went into the cellar and drank several bottles of ale and wine, and broiled some meat, ate the relicts of a fillet of veal … and then they all went off, taking two of the farmer’s horses, to carry off their luggage…” – Read’s Weekly Journal, 8 February 1735

Following the incident, worried residents of Loughton, which in those days was a small village in the forest, installed ‘Turpin traps’ in their homes to protect themselves. These were heavy wooden flaps that could be let down to block the stairs, and were wedged in place with a pole. These traps remained in some homes for decades – apparently people living in the 1890s could still remember local homes having them.

Turpin themed ornaments were popular for many years as the legend of Dick Turpin grew. He was seen romantically by some as another Robin Hood – but although an important figure in our local history, sadly all the evidence points to Dick Turpin as being nothing more than a ruthless criminal.

 

 

Art and Craft Activities

Week 3 – Trace and Colour

This is a great simple idea and fun to try at home.

 

What you need - trace and colourResources you’ll need

  • sheet of paper
  • a pencil
  • colouring pens or pencils
  • lots of different household objects with interesting shapes.

 

 

Place the objects on the paper – you might want to plan your picture by placing them all first, or just do one at a time and see what happens.  Draw around one object at a time with a pencil – overlapping the objects can make a good effect.  Colour in the objects, using different colours where they overlap.  Try colouring one colour over another and see what happens.

Have fun – and don’t forget to share your art.  We’d love to see what you come up with!

Trace and colour

Museum Garden from home

Victoria Robertson, our Community Engagement Officer, has taken the Museum Garden into her own home to keep it going while we are closed and get it ready for the new season when we reopen. Here is what she has been up to.

Garden 1

 

Celery Golden Self Blanching new

Seeds can be sown indoors or in the green house like I have. The stalks of Golden Self Blanching are much more yellow rather than green they will be ready to begin harvesting in August. They have a very strong flavour great in soups and taste great braised in the oven.

 

 

 

 

garden 2

Lettuce All The Year

These seeds will provide lettuce all year round. In the winter months they can be kept in a greenhouse, cold frame or on a window sill indoors. They are a crunchy butterhead variety a great all round lettuce excellent for salads or in sandwiches. Can be harvested at the leafy stage. If left in to mature the hearts will form.

 

 

 

Garden 3

 

Dwalf Kale is a very vigorous grower that is cold hardy. It can withstand light frost. It is an early variety of Kale that produces a great crop of crumpled deep green foliage leaves.

Spring onions

They are simple to grow in a sunny site and are an essential summer vegetable especially great in salads and omelettes.

Runner beans

Runner Beans need to be started like this in small pots. Runner Beans will usually germinate in about a week. I will have to harden off the Runner Bean plants every day for 7 days before I bring them outdoors.

Garden 4

This is the space that I will devote to the museum growing project when I move my rhubarb out of the way it will be bigger. I will also grow produce inside my greenhouse. I have removed some weeds and will dig in some well-rotted manure to improve the soil conditions. It is in full sun and will be a perfect temporary space that I can use for the project and to share the growing progress.

 

 

Art and Craft Activities

Week 2 Family Art and Craft – Easter Bunny!

Easter Bunny Mask Example photo with ears and handle

We are sorry not to see you all at the museum for our Easter Family Fun activities.  We thought you might be missing the museum as much as we are so why not have a go at the Easter Activity at home?

If you would like to have a go at one of the activities at home, here’s the Easter Bunny Mask Template 1 for our Easter Bunny Mask – it’s simple and fun to make at home.

 

 

 

Resources you’ll need

  • sheet of paper or card
  • printer (if not you can draw out the template
  • glue
  • cotton wool and any other materials to make your bunny as fun as possible.
  • string or strip of card

All you need is a sheet of paper or card.  You can print the template off, colour it in and cut it out.  If you don’t have a printer just have a go at drawing it yourself – you can even fold the paper in half lengthways so you just draw half the bunny face, then cut it out while still folded to give you the whole mask!

If you have glue you could add cotton wool and any other materials to make your bunny as fun as possible.  Just tie on some string or staple a strip of card from a cereal box on the side to make a handle to hold the mask in front of your face!  Happy Easter!!

Art and Craft Activities

While you are staying at home we thought we would share some great craft activities you could do!

Week 1: Big letters

Big letters - Family

Leanne has been making some art resource boxes for the museum.  Lots of the ideas in it are very simple things you can do at home with everyday things.  To start off, try this big letter activity – think of a word that means a lot you and have fun GOING BIG WITH IT!!

Resources you’ll need

  • paper or card (cereal boxes are perfect)
  • pencil, colouring pens or pencils
  • scrap material
  • coloured paper
  • glue

Draw outlines of your letters on card – don’t worry about making them perfect – think about turning a letter into a bubble shape.  Decorate the letters any way you like by colouring them in, sticking things to them etc.  You can keep them separate and stick them up, or make a little hole in them then thread them on to wool or string to hang up.

Here are some ideas for you:

  • The Y is made from sticking on buttons
  • The F uses fabric we had lying around
  • The L is made from felt
  • The M uses tissues screwed up into little balls and stuck on
  • The A and I are painted

Get creative and share your words with us!